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Changing places: A cross-language perspective on frequency and family size in Dutch and Hebrew

MPG-Autoren

Moscoso del Prado Martín,  Fermín
Pioneer, external;
Other Research, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

Schreuder,  Robert
Interfacultaire Werkgroep Taal- en Spraakgedrag, external;
Other Research, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

De Jong,  Nivja H.
Pioneer, external;
Other Research, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

Baayen,  R. Harald
Pioneer, external;
Other Research, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Volltexte (frei zugänglich)

Moscoso_2005_changing.pdf
(Verlagsversion), 398KB

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Zitation

Moscoso del Prado Martín, F., Deutsch, A., Frost, R., Schreuder, R., De Jong, N. H., & Baayen, R. H. (2005). Changing places: A cross-language perspective on frequency and family size in Dutch and Hebrew. Journal of Memory and Language, 53(4), 496-512. doi:10.1016/j.jml.2005.07.003.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-1E68-1
Zusammenfassung
This study uses the morphological family size effect as a tool for exploring the degree of isomorphism in the networks of morphologically related words in the Hebrew and Dutch mental lexicon. Hebrew and Dutch are genetically unrelated, and they structure their morphologically complex words in very different ways. Two visual lexical decision experiments document substantial cross-language predictivity for the family size measure after partialing out the effect of word frequency and word length. Our data show that the morphological family size effect is not restricted to Indo-European languages but extends to languages with non-concatenative morphology. In Hebrew, a new inhibitory component of the family size effect emerged that arises when a Hebrew root participates in different semantic fields.