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Morphological family size in a morphologically rich language: The case of Finnish compared to Dutch and Hebrew

MPG-Autoren

Moscoso del Prado Martín,  Fermín
Pioneer, external;
Other Research, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

Schreuder,  Robert
Interfacultaire Werkgroep Taal- en Spraakgedrag, external;
Other Research, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

Baayen,  R. Harald
Pioneer, external;
Other Research, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Volltexte (frei zugänglich)

Moscoso_2004_morphological.pdf
(Verlagsversion), 191KB

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Zitation

Moscoso del Prado Martín, F., Bertram, R., Haikio, T., Schreuder, R., & Baayen, R. H. (2004). Morphological family size in a morphologically rich language: The case of Finnish compared to Dutch and Hebrew. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 30(6), 1271-1278. doi:10.1037/0278-7393.30.6.1271.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-1B82-1
Zusammenfassung
Finnish has a very productive morphology in which a stem can give rise to several thousand words. This study presents a visual lexical decision experiment addressing the processing consequences of the huge productivity of Finnish morphology. The authors observed that in Finnish words with larger morphological families elicited shorter response latencies. However, in contrast to Dutch and Hebrew, it is not the complete morphological family of a complex Finnish word that codetermines response latencies but only the subset of words directly derived from the complex word itself. Comparisons with parallel experiments using translation equivalents in Dutch and Hebrew showed substantial cross-language predictivity of family size between Finnish and Dutch but not between Finnish and Hebrew, reflecting the different ways in which the Hebrew and Finnish morphological systems contribute to the semantic organization of concepts in the mental lexicon.