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Long-term effects of poststroke changes in sensorimotor experience on manipulation judgments involving common tools

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons23

Casasanto,  Daniel
Neurobiology of Language Group, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Chrysikou, E. G., Casasanto, D., & Thomson-Schill, S. L. (2010). Long-term effects of poststroke changes in sensorimotor experience on manipulation judgments involving common tools. Talk presented at the 51st Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society. St. Louis, MO. 2010-11-18 - 2010-11-21.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-CF0F-D
Abstract
Theories of embodied cognition suggest strong relationships between sensorimotor and cognitive systems. This study explored the possible effects of poststroke changes in sensorimotor experience on conceptual knowledge about common tools. Premorbidly right-handed patients experiencing right- or lefthand paresis due to unilateral stroke saw pictures of graspable everyday items that were oriented for either a right- or a left-handed grasp. They identified verbally the type of grasp they would employ (i.e., clench or pinch) when using each object for its typical function. Analyses of voice onset latencies were consistent with the prediction that right-paresis (leftstroke) patients would be faster in these manipulation judgments when the objects were oriented to the left, whereas left-paresis (right-stroke) patients would show the reverse pattern. The results are discussed in the context of the body specificity hypothesis, according to which people who interact with their physical environments in systematically different ways form correspondingly different mental representations.