de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
Deutsch
 
Hilfe Wegweiser Datenschutzhinweis Impressum Kontakt
  DetailsucheBrowse

Datensatz

DATENSATZ AKTIONENEXPORT

Freigegeben

Buchkapitel

In Situ Probing of Adsorbates at Electrochemical Interfaces With Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons45966

Tong,  Yujin
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons37877

Campen,  R. Kramer
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

Externe Ressourcen
Es sind keine Externen Ressourcen verfügbar
Volltexte (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Volltexte verfügbar
Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Ergänzenden Materialien verfügbar
Zitation

Tong, Y., & Campen, R. K. (2018). In Situ Probing of Adsorbates at Electrochemical Interfaces With Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy. In K. Wandelt (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Interfacial Chemistry (pp. 280-286). Amsterdam: Elsevier. doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-409547-2.14192-7.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-6408-6
Zusammenfassung
Vibrationally resonant sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy is a nonlinear optical technique capable of probing the vibrational response of molecules with interfacial specificity. Because it is all-optical and interface-specific, the technique is ideally suited to probe the electrode–electrolyte interface and can offer insight into interfacial speciation and molecular structure not possible using other means. Here we review the application of VSFG spectroscopy to characterize electrochemical systems. First we describe the background to the techniques, its differences from conventional vibrational spectroscopies, two possible experimental geometries for VSFG spectroelectrochemistry, and the expression that describes the measured VSFG intensity. Next two example systems are presented to demonstrate how application of VSFGS offers insight into electrochemical systems that is difficult to obtain with other experimental techniques: (i) the potential dependence of water structure at the gold electrode–aqueous solution interface and (ii) the reaction mechanism of formic acid electrooxidation on Pt(100).