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Intermittent compared to continuous real-time fMRI neurofeedback boosts control over amygdala activation

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons19705

Hellrung,  Lydia
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Laboratory for Social and Neural Systems Research, Department of Economics, University of Zurich, Switzerland;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons98496

Dietrich,  Anja
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons19731

Hollmann,  Maurice
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons19926

Pleger,  Burkhard
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Department of Neurology, University Hospital Bergmannsheil, Bochum, Germany;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons19762

Kalberlah,  Christian
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons22937

Roggenhofer,  Elisabeth
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University Hospital of Geneva, Switzerland;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons20065

Villringer,  Arno
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany;
Integrated Research and Treatment Center Adiposity Diseases, University of Leipzig, Germany;
Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons19734

Horstmann,  Annette
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Integrated Research and Treatment Center Adiposity Diseases, University of Leipzig, Germany;

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Citation

Hellrung, L., Dietrich, A., Hollmann, M., Pleger, B., Kalberlah, C., Roggenhofer, E., et al. (2018). Intermittent compared to continuous real-time fMRI neurofeedback boosts control over amygdala activation. NeuroImage, 166, 198-208. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.10.031.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-24DB-C
Abstract
Real-time fMRI neurofeedback is a feasible tool to learn the volitional regulation of brain activity. So far, most studies provide continuous feedback information that is presented upon every volume acquisition. Although this maximizes the temporal resolution of feedback information, it may be accompanied by some disadvantages. Participants can be distracted from the regulation task due to (1) the intrinsic delay of the hemodynamic response and associated feedback and (2) limited cognitive resources available to simultaneously evaluate feedback information and stay engaged with the task. Here, we systematically investigate differences between groups presented with different variants of feedback (continuous vs. intermittent) and a control group receiving no feedback on their ability to regulate amygdala activity using positive memories and feelings. In contrast to the feedback groups, no learning effect was observed in the group without any feedback presentation. The group receiving intermittent feedback exhibited better amygdala regulation performance when compared with the group receiving continuous feedback. Behavioural measurements show that these effects were reflected in differences in task engagement. Overall, we not only demonstrate that the presentation of feedback is a prerequisite to learn volitional control of amygdala activity but also that intermittent feedback is superior to continuous feedback presentation.