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Extensive und jährlich wechselnde Nutzungsintensität fördert den Artenreichtum im Grünland

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons129628

Lange,  Markus
Molecular Biogeochemistry Group, Dr. G. Gleixner, Department Biogeochemical Processes, Prof. S. E. Trumbore, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons62549

Schulze,  Ernst Detlef
Emeritus Group, Prof. E.-D. Schulze, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Boch, S., Allan, E., Birkhofer, K., Bossdorf, O., Blüthgen, N., Christ-Breulmann, S., et al. (2016). Extensive und jährlich wechselnde Nutzungsintensität fördert den Artenreichtum im Grünland. Anliegen Natur, 38(1), 86-95.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-01EB-D
Abstract
Among the processes currently eroding biodiversity, land-use intensification is one of the most important. Using data from 150 grasslands, in three regions of Germany, we therefore tested for effects of land-use intensity and inter-annual variation in land-use intensity on biodiversity. To measure whole ecosystem biodiversity, we introduce a new metric of multidiversity, which incorporates the diversities of up to 49 taxonomic groups of plants, animals, fungi and bacteria. Multidiversity declined with increasing land-use intensity, particularly for rarer species and aboveground groups, while common species and belowground species were less sensitive. However, high levels of inter-annual variation in land-use intensity increased overall multidiversity and slowed the rate at which the multidiversity of rarer species declined with increasing land-use intensity. In addition to decreasing mean land-use intensity, we suggest that varying land-use intensity across years, in particular varying grazing intensity over time, could be a novel strategy to reduce local biodiversity loss.