de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
English
 
Help Guide Disclaimer Contact us Login
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Evaluating the effect of nutrient redistribution by animals on the phosphorus cycle of lowland Amazonia

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons62350

Buendía,  C.
Land Surface Dynamics, Research Group Biospheric Theory and Modelling, Dr. A. Kleidon, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons62438

Kleidon,  Axel
Research Group Biospheric Theory and Modelling, Dr. A. Kleidon, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

Locator
Fulltext (public)

BGC2628D.pdf
(Publisher version), 3MB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Buendía, C., Kleidon, A., Manzoni, S., Reu, B., & Porporato, A. (2017). Evaluating the effect of nutrient redistribution by animals on the phosphorus cycle of lowland Amazonia. Biogeosciences Discussions. doi:10.5194/bg-2017-121.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-22DD-5
Abstract
Amazonian ecosystems are of global importance for the climate system and biodiversity. Phosphorus (P) is suggested to be a limited nutrient in many Amazonian ecosystems because soils are ancient, highly weathered, and nutrient depleted. Recently, it has been suggested that large herbivores may play a major role in the Amazon nutrient cycle. Here, we develop this hypothesis further and show how the spatial redistribution of P from rivers to land, across different ecosystems and between sub-basins may even sustain the Amazonian P cycle, and this not only by means of large herbivores, which supposedly were present previously to human arrival to the contient, but by different animal foraging strategies that exist today. To do so, we introduce a simple mathematical framework, which synthesizes the major processes of the Amazonian P cycle and allows for quantifying their relative contribution to the P budget. With this model we use sensitivity analyses to demonstrate how animals can affect the P cycle. Our findings suggest the importance of the interweaved Amazonian ecology, including fish migrations, different flooding and soil moisture regimes as well as the role of different animal foraging strategies for a sustainable P cycling in these ecosystems.