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Journal Article

Transverse Angular Momentum and Geometric Spin Hall Effect of Light

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons200999

Aiello,  Andrea
Optical Quantum Information Theory, Leuchs Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons201116

Lindlein,  Norbert
Optical Design and Microoptics, Leuchs Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons201126

Marquardt,  Christoph
Quantum Information Processing, Leuchs Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons201115

Leuchs,  Gerd
Leuchs Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Aiello, A., Lindlein, N., Marquardt, C., & Leuchs, G. (2009). Transverse Angular Momentum and Geometric Spin Hall Effect of Light. PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS, 103(10): 100401. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.100401.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-6BB1-1
Abstract
We present a novel fundamental phenomenon occurring when a polarized beam of light is observed from a reference frame tilted with respect to the direction of propagation of the beam. This effect has a purely geometric nature and amounts to a polarization-dependent shift or split of the beam intensity distribution evaluated as the time-averaged flux of the Poynting vector across the plane of observation. We demonstrate that such a shift is unavoidable whenever the beam possesses a nonzero transverse angular momentum. This latter result has general validity and applies to arbitrary systems such as, e.g., electronic and atomic beams.