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Journal Article

B-1a B cells that Link the Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses Are Lacking in the Absence of the Spleen

MPS-Authors

Wardemann,  Hedda
Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons190993

Boehm,  Thomas
Department of Developmental Immunology, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons191020

Dear,  Neil
Department of Developmental Immunology, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons191009

Carsetti,  Rita
Department of Developmental Immunology, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Wardemann, H., Boehm, T., Dear, N., & Carsetti, R. (2002). B-1a B cells that Link the Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses Are Lacking in the Absence of the Spleen. Journal of Experimental Medicine, 195(6), 771-780.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-9658-F
Abstract
Splenectomized individuals are prone to overwhelining infections with encapsulated bacteria and splenectomy of mice increases susceptibility to streptococcal infections, yet the exact mechanism by which the spleen protects against such infections is unknown. Using congenitally asplenic mice as a model, we show that the spleen is essential for the generation of B-1a cells, a B cell population that cooperates with the innate immune system to control early bacterial and viral growth. Splenectomy of wild-type mice further demonstrated that the spleen is also important for the survival of B-1a cells. Transfer experiments demonstrate that lack of these cells, as opposed to the absence of the spleen per se, is associated with an inability to mount a rapid immune response against streptococcal polysaccharides. Thus, absence of the spleen and the associated increased susceptibility to streptococcal infections is correlated with lack of B-1a B cells. These findings reveal a hitherto unknown role of the spleen in generating and maintaining the B-1a B cell pool.