de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
English
 
Help Guide Disclaimer Contact us Login
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Beneficial or Deleterious Effects of a Preexisting Hypersensitivity to Bacterial Components on the Course and Outcome of Infection

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons191079

Gumenscheimer,  Marina
Metchnikoff Laboratory, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons191064

Galanos,  Chris
Emeritus Group: Cellular Immunology, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons191059

Freudenberg,  Marina A.
Department of Developmental Immunology, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Gumenscheimer, M., Mitov, I., Galanos, C., & Freudenberg, M. A. (2002). Beneficial or Deleterious Effects of a Preexisting Hypersensitivity to Bacterial Components on the Course and Outcome of Infection. Infection and Immunity, 70(10), 5596-5603.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-9603-B
Abstract
Priming with heat-killed Propionibacterium acnes enhances the sensitivity of mice to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and other biologically active bacterial components. We show that P. acnes priming has protective and deleterious effects on a subsequent serovar Typhimurium infection. It may result in a complete protection or prolonged survival, or it may accelerate mortality of the infected mice, depending on the number of serovar Typhimurium bacteria administered and on the degree of LPS hypersensitivity at the time of infection. Both effects of P. aches-induced hypersensitivity are mediated by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and are based on a differential activation of the innate immune mechanisms which recognize and react against the LPS present in infecting bacteria. In P. aches-primed mice null for LPS-binding protein (LBP-/- mice), the impaired LPS recognition, due to the absence of LBP, resulted in a higher resistance to serovar Typhimurium infection. A similar P. acnes priming of mice had a protective, but no deleterious effect on a subsequent L. monocytogenes infection. This effect was IFN-γ dependent but independent of LBP.