de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
English
 
Help Guide Disclaimer Contact us Login
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

DNA nanotechnology and fluorescence applications

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons197581

Schlichthaerle,  Thomas
Jungmann, Ralf / Molecular Imaging and Bionanotechnology, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons186093

Strauss,  Maximilian T.
Jungmann, Ralf / Molecular Imaging and Bionanotechnology, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons197583

Schueder,  Florian
Jungmann, Ralf / Molecular Imaging and Bionanotechnology, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons186095

Woehrstein,  Johannes B.
Jungmann, Ralf / Molecular Imaging and Bionanotechnology, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons172959

Jungmann,  Ralf
Jungmann, Ralf / Molecular Imaging and Bionanotechnology, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Schlichthaerle, T., Strauss, M. T., Schueder, F., Woehrstein, J. B., & Jungmann, R. (2016). DNA nanotechnology and fluorescence applications. Current Opinion in Biotechnology, 39, 41-47. doi:10.1016/j.copbio.2015.12.014.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-1042-C
Abstract
Structural DNA nanotechnology allow researchers to use the unique molecular recognition properties of DNA strands to construct nanoscale objects with almost arbitrary complexity in two and three dimensions. Abstracted as molecular breadboards, DNA nanostructures enable nanometer-precise placement of guest molecules such as proteins, fluorophores, or nanoparticles. These assemblies can be used to study biological phenomena with unprecedented control over number, spacing, and molecular identity. Here, we give a general introduction to structural DNA nanotechnology and more specifically discuss applications of DNA nanostructures in the field of fluorescence and plasmonics.