de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
English
 
Help Guide Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Ordering structured populations in multiplayer cooperation games

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons128422

Peña,  Jorge
Department Evolutionary Theory, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons57014

Wu,  Bin
Department Evolutionary Theory, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56973

Traulsen,  Arne
Department Evolutionary Theory, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

Fulltext (public)

Pena_Wu_Traulsen_2016.pdf
(Publisher version), 480KB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Peña, J., Wu, B., & Traulsen, A. (2016). Ordering structured populations in multiplayer cooperation games. Journal of the Royal Society, Interface / the Royal Society, 13(114): 20150881. doi:10.1098/rsif.2015.0881.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-C40B-1
Abstract
Spatial structure greatly affects the evolution of cooperation. While in two-player games the condition for cooperation to evolve depends on a single structure coefficient, in multiplayer games the condition might depend on several structure coefficients, making it difficult to compare different population structures. We propose a solution to this issue by introducing two simple ways of ordering population structures: the containment order and the volume order. If population structure [Formula: see text] is greater than population structure [Formula: see text] in the containment or the volume order, then [Formula: see text] can be considered a stronger promoter of cooperation. We provide conditions for establishing the containment order, give general results on the volume order, and illustrate our theory by comparing different models of spatial games and associated update rules. Our results hold for a large class of population structures and can be easily applied to specific cases once the structure coefficients have been calculated or estimated.