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Higher body mass index in older adults is associated with lower gray matter volume: Implications for memory performance

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons98578

Kharabian,  Shahrzad
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons19531

Arélin,  Katrin
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases (LIFE), University of Leipzig, Germany;
Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons19734

Horstmann,  Annette
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Integrated Research and Treatment Center Adiposity Diseases, University of Leipzig, Germany;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons188905

Lampe,  Leonie
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases (LIFE), University of Leipzig, Germany;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons22895

Kipping,  Judy
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons19981

Schroeter,  Matthias L.
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany;
Integrated Research and Treatment Center Adiposity Diseases, University of Leipzig, Germany;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons20065

Villringer,  Arno
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany;
Collaborative Research Center Obesity Mechanisms, Institute of Biochemistry, University of Leipzig, Germany;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons128137

Witte,  Veronica
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Collaborative Research Center Obesity Mechanisms, Institute of Biochemistry, University of Leipzig, Germany;

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Zitation

Kharabian, S., Arélin, K., Horstmann, A., Lampe, L., Kipping, J., Luck, T., et al. (2016). Higher body mass index in older adults is associated with lower gray matter volume: Implications for memory performance. Neurobiology of Aging, 40, 1-10. doi:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2015.12.020.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-4DA4-3
Zusammenfassung
Midlife obesity has been associated with increased dementia risk, yet reports on brain structure and function are mixed. We therefore assessed the effects of body mass index (BMI) on gray matter volume (GMV) and cognition in a well-characterized sample of community-dwelled older adults. GMV was measured using 3T-neuroimaging in 617 participants (258 women, 60-80 years, BMI 17-41 kg/m2). Also, cognitive performance and various confounders including hypertension, diabetes and APOE-genotype were assessed. A higher BMI correlated significantly with lower GMV in multiple brain regions, including (pre)frontal, temporal, insular and occipital cortex, thalamus, putamen, amygdala and cerebellum, even after adjusting for confounders. Also, lower GMV in prefrontal and thalamic areas partially mediated negative effects of (1) higher BMI and (2) higher age on memory performance. We here showed that a higher BMI in older adults is associated with widespread gray matter alterations, irrespective of obesity-related co-morbidities and other confounders. Our results further indicate that a higher BMI induces structural alterations that translate into subtle impairments in memory performance in aging.