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35 Cl NQR and 2H NMR analysis of the low-frequency dynamics close to the displacive normal-incommensurate phase transition in an organic crystal

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons94312

Meinel,  Christoph
Research Group Prof. Dr. Haeberlen, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons128263

Zimmermann,  Herbert
Department of Molecular Physics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;
Department of Biomolecular Mechanisms, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Etrillard, J., Meinel, C., Odin, C., Zimmermann, H., Toudic, B., & Ameline, J. C. (1999). 35 Cl NQR and 2H NMR analysis of the low-frequency dynamics close to the displacive normal-incommensurate phase transition in an organic crystal. Applied Magnetic Resonance, 17(2), 301-313. doi:10.1007/BF03162167.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-A6CA-8
Abstract
Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments, 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) and 2H NMR, have been performed close to the displacive normal-incommensurate phase transition in the organic crystal of bis-(4-chlorophenyl)-sulfone. Calculations using coherent neutron scattering results show that the soft-mode contribution cannot explain the rapid increase of the spin-lattice relaxation rates close to the transition temperature. Calculations of the spectral densities taking into account the existence of a central-peak phenomenon describe both 35Cl NQR and 2H NMR spin-lattice relaxation rates on approaching the phase transition. In this way, the width of the central peak can be estimated to be in the range of several gigahertz