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Calcium channel types with distinct presynaptic localization couple differentially to transmitter release in single calyx-type synapses

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons123519

Wu,  Ling-Gang
Department of Cell Physiology, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons92286

Borst,  J. Gerard G.
Department of Cell Physiology, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons95089

Sakmann,  Bert
Department of Cell Physiology, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Wu, L.-G., Westenbroek, R. E., Borst, J. G. G., Catterall, W. A., & Sakmann, B. (1999). Calcium channel types with distinct presynaptic localization couple differentially to transmitter release in single calyx-type synapses. The Journal of Neuroscience, 19, 726-736. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9880593.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-A42F-5
Zusammenfassung
We studied how Ca2+ influx through different subtypes of Ca2+ channels couples to release at a calyx-type terminal in the rat medial nucleus of the trapezoid body by simultaneously measuring the presynaptic Ca2+ influx evoked by a single action potential and the EPSC. Application of subtype-specific toxins showed that Ca2+ channels of the P/Q-, N-, and R-type controlled glutamate release at a single terminal. The Ca2+influx through the P/Q-type channels triggered release more effectively than Ca2+ influx through N- or R-type channels. We investigated mechanisms that contributed to these differences in effectiveness. Electrophysiological experiments suggested that individual release sites were controlled by all three subtypes of Ca2+ channels. Immunocytochemical staining indicated, however, that a substantial fraction of N- and R-type channels was located distant from release sites. Although these distant channels contributed to the Ca2+ influx into the terminal, they may not contribute to release. Taken together, the results suggest that the Ca2+ influx into the calyx via N- and R-type channels triggers release less effectively than that via P/Q-type because a substantial fraction of the N- and R-type channels in the calyx is localized distant from release sites