de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
Deutsch
 
Hilfe Wegweiser Impressum Kontakt Einloggen
  DetailsucheBrowse

Datensatz

DATENSATZ AKTIONENEXPORT

Freigegeben

Zeitschriftenartikel

History of bioavailable lead and iron in the Greater North Sea and Iceland during the last millennium - A bivalve sclerochronological reconstruction

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons101034

Jochum,  Klaus P.
Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

Externe Ressourcen
Es sind keine Externen Ressourcen verfügbar
Volltexte (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Volltexte verfügbar
Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Ergänzenden Materialien verfügbar
Zitation

Holland, H. A., Schöne, B. R., Marali, S., & Jochum, K. P. (2014). History of bioavailable lead and iron in the Greater North Sea and Iceland during the last millennium - A bivalve sclerochronological reconstruction. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 87(1-2), 104-116. doi:10.1016/j.marpolbul.2014.08.005.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-B068-4
Zusammenfassung
We present the first annually resolved record of biologically available Pb and Fe in the Greater North Sea and Iceland during 1040-2004 AD based on shells of the long-lived marine bivalve Arctica islandica. The iron content in pre-industrial shells from the North Sea largely remained below the detection limit. Only since 1830, shell Fe levels rose gradually reflecting the combined effect of increased terrestrial runoff of iron-bearing sediments and eutrophication. Although the lead gasoline peak of the 20th century was well recorded by the shells, bivalves that lived during the medieval heyday of metallurgy showed four-fold higher shell Pb levels than modern specimens. Presumably, pre-industrial bivalves were offered larger proportions of resuspended (Pb-enriched) organics, whereas modern specimens receive fresh increased amounts of (Pb-depleted) phytoplankton. As expected, metal loads in the shells from Iceland were much lower. Our study confirms that bivalve shells provide a powerful tool for retrospective environmental biomonitoring. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.