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Fluorescence fluctuation microscopy: a diversified arsenal of methods to investigate molecular dynamics inside cells

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons86724

Weidemann,  Thomas
Schwille, Petra / Cellular and Molecular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons138355

Mücksch,  Jonas
Schwille, Petra / Cellular and Molecular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons15815

Schwille,  Petra
Schwille, Petra / Cellular and Molecular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Weidemann, T., Mücksch, J., & Schwille, P. (2014). Fluorescence fluctuation microscopy: a diversified arsenal of methods to investigate molecular dynamics inside cells. CURRENT OPINION IN STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY, 28, 69-76. doi:10.1016/j.sbi.2014.07.008.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-9235-B
Abstract
Fluorescence microscopy provides insight into the subcellular organization of biological functions. However, images are snap shots averaging over a highly dynamic molecular system. Fluorescence fluctuation microscopy, employing similar detection technology, encompasses a powerful arsenal of analysis tools that investigate the molecular heterogeneity in space and time. Analyzing signal fluctuations from small ensembles (several hundred particles) reveals their concentration, the stoichiometry, the stochastic motion, as well as superimposed signatures of the environment such as spatial confinement and binding events. Thus, fluctuation analysis provides access to dynamic molecular properties that can be used to build physical models of cellular processes. In the last decade these methods experienced a remarkable diversification, which we revisit here with a particular focus on live cell applications.