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The effects of neonatal cryoanaesthesia-induced hypothermia on adult emotional behaviour and stress markers in C57BL/6 mice.

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons95439

Sprengel,  Rolf
Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Richter, S. H., Wollmanna, E., Schmidt, M., Zillmann, U., Hellweg, R., Sprengel, R., et al. (2014). The effects of neonatal cryoanaesthesia-induced hypothermia on adult emotional behaviour and stress markers in C57BL/6 mice. Behavioural Brain Research, 270, 300-306. doi:10.1016/j.bbr.2014.05.002.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0023-C8C9-D
Abstract
Since the early 1930s, deep hypothermia (cryoanaesthesia) has been a useful anaesthetic in several types of surgery on neonatal rodents. Especially against the background of modern techniques in systems neuroscience, the method enjoys again increasing popularity. However, little is known about its effects on the subsequent adult behavioural and physiological profile. To systematically investigate the effects of neonatal cryoanaesthesia on adult basal and emotional behaviour as well as on physiological development, 59 C57BL/6 mouse pups were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: Pups of the first group were exposed to the hypothermia treatment (H) on postnatal day 3, while pups of the other two groups served as controls: These pups either remained in the home cage without any intervention (C), or were separated from the mother for 15 min (MS) to differentiate between effects of neonatal isolation alone versus hypothermia that inevitably goes along with neonatal isolation. Subsequent behavioural analyses were conducted during adulthood (P 84–P 130), including tests for exploratory, anxiety-like and depression-like behaviour. At the age of about 145 days mice were decapitated to record BDNF levels in the hippocampus and serum corticosterone. Altogether, H mice were found to display slightly increased anxiety levels on the O-Maze, but did not differ from the control animals in any other behavioural test. Subtle alterations in anxiety-like behaviour, however, were not accompanied by physiological changes in serum corticosterone and hippocampal BDNF levels, arguing against an overall long-lasting effect of neonatal hypothermia on the emotional profile of adult mice.