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Journal Article

High-resolution Fourier-encoded sub-millisecond echo time musculoskeletal imaging at 3 Tesla and 7 Tesla

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84187

Scheffler,  K
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Deligianni, X., Bär, P., Scheffler, K., Trattnig, S., & Bieri, O. (2013). High-resolution Fourier-encoded sub-millisecond echo time musculoskeletal imaging at 3 Tesla and 7 Tesla. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 70(5), 1434-1439. doi:10.1002/mrm.24578.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-001A-129F-A
Abstract
Purpose: The feasibility of imaging musculoskeletal fibrous tissue components, such as menisci, ligaments, and tendons, with a conventional spoiled gradient echo technique is explored in vivo at 3 T and 7 T. Methods: To this end, the echo time (TE1) of a conventional Fourier-encoded multicontrast three-dimensional SGPR sequence is minimized by using nonselective excitation pulses, highly asymmetric readouts, and a variable TE1 along the phase and slice encoding direction. In addition, a fully sampled second echo image (with TE2 >> TE1) can be used to highlight components with short transverse relaxation times in a difference image with positive contrast. Results: Fourier-encoded spoiled gradient echo sequences are able to provide sub-millisecond TE1 of about 800 μs for typical in-plane resolutions of about 0.5 x 0.5 mm2. As a result, high-resolution positive contrast images of fibrous tissues can be generated within clinically feasible scan-time of about 2–7 minutes. Conclusion: After optimization, Fourier-encoded spoiled gradient echo provides a highly robust and flexible imaging technique for high-resolution positive contrast imaging of fibrous tissue that can readily be used in the clinical routine.