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Predicting individual variation in language from infant speech perception measures

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons32807

Cristia,  Alejandrina
Neurobiology of Language Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et Psycholinguistique;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons69

Hagoort,  Peter
Neurobiology of Language Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, External Organizations;

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2014_Cristia_ChildDev-1.pdf
(Verlagsversion), 775KB

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Zitation

Cristia, A., Seidl, A., Junge, C., Soderstrom, M., & Hagoort, P. (2014). Predicting individual variation in language from infant speech perception measures. Child development, 85(4), 1330-1345. doi:10.1111/cdev.12193.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0019-EF39-C
Zusammenfassung
There are increasing reports that individual variation in behavioral and neurophysiological measures of infant speech processing predicts later language outcomes, and specifically concurrent or subsequent vocabulary size. If such findings are held up under scrutiny, they could both illuminate theoretical models of language development and contribute to the prediction of communicative disorders. A qualitative, systematic review of this emergent literature illustrated the variety of approaches that have been used and highlighted some conceptual problems regarding the measurements. A quantitative analysis of the same data established that the bivariate relation was significant, with correlations of similar strength to those found for well-established nonlinguistic predictors of language. Further exploration of infant speech perception predictors, particularly from a methodological perspective, is recommended.