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Journal Article

Optogenetic assessment of horizontal interactions in primary visual cortex

MPS-Authors

Huang,  X.
Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience, Max Planck Society;

Elyada,  Y. M.
Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience, Max Planck Society;

Bosking,  W. H.
Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience, Max Planck Society;

Walker,  T.
Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience, Max Planck Society;

Fitzpatrick,  D.
Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Huang, X., Elyada, Y. M., Bosking, W. H., Walker, T., & Fitzpatrick, D. (2014). Optogenetic assessment of horizontal interactions in primary visual cortex. The Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 34(Apr 2 2014), 4976-4990. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4116-13.2014.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0019-00A5-3
Abstract
Columnar organization of orientation selectivity and clustered horizontal connections linking orientation columns are two of the distinctive organizational features of primary visual cortex in many mammalian species. However, the functional role of these connections has been harder to characterize. Here we examine the extent and nature of horizontal interactions in V1 of the tree shrew using optical imaging of intrinsic signals, optogenetic stimulation, and multi-unit recording. Surprisingly, we find the effects of optogenetic stimulation depend primarily on distance and not on the specific orientation domains or axes in the cortex, which are stimulated. In addition, across a wide range of variation in both visual and optogenetic stimulation we find linear addition of the two inputs. These results emphasize that the cortex provides a rich substrate for functional interactions that are not limited to the orientation-specific interactions predicted by the monosynaptic distribution of horizontal connections.