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Journal Article

Synaptic Scaling and Homeostatic Plasticity in the Mouse Visual Cortex In Vivo

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons38919

Keck,  Tara
Department: Synapses-Circuits-Plasticity / Bonhoeffer, MPI of Neurobiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons59456

Keller,  Georg B.
Department: Synapses-Circuits-Plasticity / Bonhoeffer, MPI of Neurobiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons39212

Jacobsen,  R. Irene
Department: Synapses-Circuits-Plasticity / Bonhoeffer, MPI of Neurobiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons38769

Bonhoeffer,  Tobias
Department: Synapses-Circuits-Plasticity / Bonhoeffer, MPI of Neurobiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons38901

Hübener,  Mark
Department: Synapses-Circuits-Plasticity / Bonhoeffer, MPI of Neurobiology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Keck, T., Keller, G. B., Jacobsen, R. I., Eysel, U. T., Bonhoeffer, T., & Hübener, M. (2013). Synaptic Scaling and Homeostatic Plasticity in the Mouse Visual Cortex In Vivo. NEURON, 80(2), 327-334. doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2013.08.018.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-C26C-5
Abstract
Homeostatic plasticity is important to maintain a set level of activity in neuronal circuits and has been most extensively studied in cell cultures following activity blockade. It is still unclear, however, whether activity changes associated with mechanisms of homeostatic plasticity occur in vivo, for example after changes in sensory input. Here, we show that activity levels in the visual cortex are significantly decreased after sensory deprivation by retinal lesions, followed by a gradual increase in activity levels in the 48 hr after deprivation. These activity changes are associated with synaptic scaling, manifested in vitro by an increase in mEPSC amplitude and in vivo by an increase in spine size. Together, these data show that homeostatic activity changes occur in vivo in parallel with synaptic scaling.