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Graffiti: Graph-based Classification in Heterogeneous Networks

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons44021

Angelova,  Ralitsa
Databases and Information Systems, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons44738

Kasneci,  Gjergji
Databases and Information Systems, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons45720

Weikum,  Gerhard
Databases and Information Systems, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Angelova, R., Kasneci, G., & Weikum, G. (2012). Graffiti: Graph-based Classification in Heterogeneous Networks. World Wide Web, 15(2), 139-170. doi:10.1007/s11280-011-0126-4.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-59F8-7
Zusammenfassung
We address the problem of multi-label classification in heterogeneous graphs, where nodes belong to different types and different types have different sets of classification labels. We present a novel approach that aims to classify nodes based on their neighborhoods. We model the mutual influence of nodes as a random walk in which the random surfer aims at distributing class labels to nodes while walking through the graph. When viewing class labels as “colors”, the random surfer is essentially spraying different node types with different color palettes; hence the name Graffiti of our method. In contrast to previous work on topic-based random surfer models, our approach captures and exploits the mutual influence of nodes of the same type based on their connections to nodes of other types. We show important properties of our algorithm such as convergence and scalability. We also confirm the practical viability of Graffiti by an experimental study on subsets of the popular social networks Flickr and LibraryThing. We demonstrate the superiority of our approach by comparing it to three other state-of-the-art techniques for graph-based classification.