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Journal Article

Central nervous processing of behaviourally relevant odours in solitary and gregarious fifth instar locusts, Schistocerca gregaria

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Ignell, R., Anton, S., & Hansson, B. (1998). Central nervous processing of behaviourally relevant odours in solitary and gregarious fifth instar locusts, Schistocerca gregaria. Journal of Comparative Physiology A-Neuroethology Sensory Neural and Behavioral Physiology, 183(4), 453-465. doi:10.1007/s003590050271.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-674F-0
Abstract
Physiological and morphological characteristics of antennal lobe neurons of solitary and gregarious fifth-instar nymphs of the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria, were studied using intracellular recording and staining techniques. Physiological characteristics of antennal lobe neurons of both locust phases responding to stage-dependent aggregation pheromones, egg-laying attractants, a putative sex pheromone and plant-associated volatiles are described. Antennal lobe neurons showed excitatory, inhibitory, combined excitatory and inhibitory and delayed responses. In addition, one neuron showing an initial inhibition followed by an excitation and inhibition response was found. Pheromone-specific-, plant-specific- and pheromone-plant-generalist neurons were found in both locust phases. Antennal lobe neurons displayed stage- and phase-dependent differences in the processing of aggregation pheromone component input. Nymphal antennal lobe neurons showed stage-dependent response characteristics highly correlated with the preferential behavioural attraction to the nymphal aggregation pheromone. Phase-dependent differences were found in the response spectra and the sensitivity of the same neuron types. Neurons of solitary locusts responded significantly more frequently to some of the tested components than neurons of gregarious locusts. Furthermore, antennal lobe neurons of solitary locusts showed a higher sensitivity to most of the tested compounds.