de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
English
 
Help Guide Disclaimer Contact us Login
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Memory decay and susceptibility to amnesia dissociate punishment- from relief-learning

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84672

Appel,  Mirjam
Max Planck Research Group: Behavioral Genetics / Tanimoto, MPI of Neurobiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons39126

Yarali,  Ayse
Max Planck Research Group: Behavioral Genetics / Tanimoto, MPI of Neurobiology, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)

20121171.full.pdf
(Any fulltext), 473KB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Diegelmann, S., Preuschoff, S., Appel, M., Niewalda, T., Gerber, B., & Yarali, A. (2013). Memory decay and susceptibility to amnesia dissociate punishment- from relief-learning. BIOLOGY LETTERS, 9(4): 20121171. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2012.1171.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-446B-C
Abstract
Painful events shape future behaviour in two ways: stimuli associated with pain onset subsequently support learned avoidance (i.e. punishment-learning) because they signal future, upcoming pain. Stimuli associated with pain offset in turn signal relief and later on support learned approach (i.e. relief-learning). The relative strengths of such punishment-and relief-learning can be crucial for the adaptive organization of behaviour in the aftermath of painful events. Using Drosophila, we compare punishment-and relief-memories in terms of their temporal decay and sensitivity to retrograde amnesia. During the first 75 min following training, relief-memory is stable, whereas punishment-memory decays to half of the initial score. By 24 h after training, however, relief-memory is lost, whereas a third of punishment-memory scores still remain. In accordance with such rapid temporal decay from 75 min on, retrograde amnesia erases relief-memory but leaves a half of punishment-memory scores intact. These findings suggest differential mechanistic bases for punishment-and relief-memory, thus offering possibilities for separately interfering with either of them.