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Journal Article

The irradiation history of the Ghubara (L5) regolith breecia

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons100938

Franke,  L.
Cosmochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons101244

Scherer,  P.
Cosmochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons101260

Schultz,  L.
Cosmochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Ferko, T. E., Wang, M. S., Hillegonds, D. J., Lipschutz, M. E., Hutchison, R., Franke, L., et al. (2002). The irradiation history of the Ghubara (L5) regolith breecia. Meteoritics and Planetary Science, 37(3), 311-327.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-9142-A
Abstract
We measured cosmic-ray products-noble gases, radionuclides, thermoluminescence, and nuclear tracks-and trace element contents and mineralogy of samples of three orthogonal and mutually intersecting cores (41-46 cm long) of a 101.6 kg Ghubara individual (1958,805) at The Natural History Museum, London. The xenoliths, like the host, have high concentrations of trapped solar gases and are heavily shocked. While contents of noble gases and degree of shock-loading in this individual and three others differ somewhat, the data indicate that Ghubara is a two-generation regolith breccia. Contents of cosmogenic Al-26 and Be-10 and low track densities indicate that the Ghubara individuals were located more than 15 cm below the surface of an 85 cm meteoroid. Because of its large size, Ghubara's cosmic-ray exposure age is poorly defined to be 15-20 Ma from cosmogenic nuclides. Ghubara's terrestrial age, based on C-14 data, is 2-3 ka. Not only is Ghubara the first known case of a two-generation regolith breccia on the macroscale, it also has a complicated thermal and irradiation history.