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Free radicals and fast photochemistry during BERLIOZ

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons101122

Martinez,  M.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons101068

Klüpfel,  T.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons101178

Perner,  D.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Platt, U., Alicke, B., Dubois, R., Geyer, A., Hofzumahaus, A., Holland, F., et al. (2002). Free radicals and fast photochemistry during BERLIOZ. Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry, 42(1), 359-394.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-9112-5
Abstract
The free radicals OH, HO2, RO2, and NO3 are known to be the driving force for most chemical processes in the atmosphere. Since the low concentration of the above radicals makes measurements particularly difficult, only relatively few direct measurements of free radical concentrations have been reported to date. We present a comprehensive set of simultaneous radical measurements performed by Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF), Matrix Isolation - Electron spin Resonance (MI-ESR), Peroxy Radical Chemical Amplification (PERCA), and Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) during the BERLIner OZonexperiment (BERLIOZ) during July and August of 1998 near Berlin, Germany. Most of the above radical species were measured by more than one technique and an intercomparison gave good agreement. This data set offered the possibility to study and quantify the role of each radical at a rural, semi-polluted site in the continental boundary layer and to investigate interconnections and dependencies among these free radicals. In general (box) modelled diurnal profiles of the different radicals reproduced the measurements quite well, however measured absolute levels are frequently lower than model predictions. These discrepancies point to disturbing deficiencies in our understanding of the chemical system in urban air masses. In addition considerable night-time peroxy radical production related to VOC reactions with NO3 and O-3 could be quantified.