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Global budget of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide: Temporal and spatial variations of the dominant sources and sinks

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons101058

Kettle,  A. J.
Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons101085

Kuhn,  U.
Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons101344

von Hobe,  M.
Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons101057

Kesselmeier,  J.
Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons100833

Andreae,  M. O.
Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Kettle, A. J., Kuhn, U., von Hobe, M., Kesselmeier, J., & Andreae, M. O. (2002). Global budget of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide: Temporal and spatial variations of the dominant sources and sinks. Journal of Geophysical Research, 107(D22): 4658. doi:10.1029/2002JD002187.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-9062-6
Abstract
[1] The spatial and temporal variability of the global fluxes of carbonyl sulfide (COS) is discussed together with possible implications for total column atmospheric COS loading. The input of COS into the atmosphere is calculated as the sum of all known direct sources of COS plus the conversion of carbon disulfide (CS2) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) to COS by atmospheric oxidation processes. Recent models are used to predict COS, CS2, and DMS release from the oceans and COS uptake by soils, plants, and oceans. This forward approach to constructing global integrated COS fluxes has a large associated range of uncertainty. The best guess global annual- integrated COS net flux estimate does not differ from zero within the range of estimated uncertainty, consistent with the observed absence of long-term trends in atmospheric COS loading. Interestingly, the hemispheric time-dependent monthly fluxes are very close in phase for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The monthly variation of the Northern Hemisphere flux seems to be driven primarily by high COS vegetation uptake in summer, while the monthly variation of the Southern Hemisphere flux appears to be driven mostly by high oceanic fluxes of COS, CS2, and DMS in summer.