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Vortrag

The role of selective inhibition in semantic interference tasks

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons1167

Meyer,  Antje S.
Psychology of Language Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, External Organizations;

Shao,  Zeshu
Psychology of Language Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons96448

Roelofs,  Ardi
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, External Organizations;
Psychology of Language Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Meyer, A. S., Shao, Z., Randi, M., & Roelofs, A. (2013). The role of selective inhibition in semantic interference tasks. Talk presented at Bangor Meeting of the Experimental Psychology Society. Bangor. 2013-07-03 - 2013-07-05.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-195B-B
Zusammenfassung
Recently many authors have stressed that domain-general cognitive processes may affect performance in linguistic tasks. This challenges the traditional view that speaking and listening are fairly modular processes. Going beyond this broad claim, we aim to determine exactly how domain-general processes influence linguistic processes. In the present study we examined the influence of selective inhibition (invoked to suppress responses to potent competitors to target stimuli and taking some time to build up) on performance in two classic word production tasks, the semantic blocking task (naming sets of objects that do vs. do not belong to the same semantic category) and the pictureword interference task (naming pictures accompanied by categorically related vs. unrelated words). Both tasks were completed by the same participants. Analyses of the size of the interference effects for fast and slower responses (using delta plots) and of the correlations of the effect sizes in the two tasks demonstrated that selective inhibition was recruited in both tasks. We propose that the process supported by selective inhibition is lemma selection. We discuss the implications for theories concerning the origin of the interference effects in the two paradigms and the nature of lexical selection processes.