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RNA Interference of LIN5 in Tomato Confirms Its Role in Controlling Brix Content, Uncovers the Influence of Sugars on the Levels of Fruit Hormones, and Demonstrates the Importance of Sucrose Cleavage for Normal Fruit Development and Fertility

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97488

Zanor,  M. I.
Central Metabolism, Department Willmitzer, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97329

Osorio,  S.
Central Metabolism, Department Willmitzer, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97323

Nunes-Nesi,  A.
Central Metabolism, Department Willmitzer, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97099

Carrari,  F.
Central Metabolism, Department Willmitzer, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97281

Lohse,  M.
Integrative Carbon Biology, Department Stitt, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97455

Usadel,  B.
Integrative Carbon Biology, Department Stitt, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97166

Giavalisco,  P.
Small Molecules, Department Willmitzer, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97481

Willmitzer,  L.
Small Molecules, Department Willmitzer, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97433

Sulpice,  R.
System Regulation, Department Stitt, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97147

Fernie,  A. R.
Central Metabolism, Department Willmitzer, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

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Zanor-2009-RNA Interference of.pdf
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Zitation

Zanor, M. I., Osorio, S., Nunes-Nesi, A., Carrari, F., Lohse, M., Usadel, B., et al. (2009). RNA Interference of LIN5 in Tomato Confirms Its Role in Controlling Brix Content, Uncovers the Influence of Sugars on the Levels of Fruit Hormones, and Demonstrates the Importance of Sucrose Cleavage for Normal Fruit Development and Fertility. Plant Physiology, 150(3), 1204-1218. doi:10.1104/pp.109.136598.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-2497-C
Zusammenfassung
It has been previously demonstrated, utilizing intraspecific introgression lines, that Lycopersicum Invertase5 (LIN5), which encodes a cell wall invertase, controls total soluble solids content in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). The physiological role of this protein, however, has not yet been directly studied, since evaluation of data obtained from the introgression lines is complicated by the fact that they additionally harbor many other wild species alleles. To allow a more precise comparison, we generated transgenic tomato in which we silenced the expression of LIN5 using the RNA interference approach. The transformants were characterized by an altered flower and fruit morphology, displaying increased numbers of petals and sepals per flower, an increased rate of fruit abortion, and a reduction in fruit size. Evaluation of the mature fruit revealed that the transformants were characterized by a reduction of seed number per plant. Furthermore, detailed physiological analysis revealed that the transformants displayed aberrant pollen morphology and a reduction in the rate of pollen tube elongation. Metabolite profiling of ovaries and green and red fruit revealed that metabolic changes in the transformants were largely confined to sugar metabolism, whereas transcript and hormone profiling revealed broad changes both in the hormones themselves and in transcripts encoding their biosynthetic enzymes and response elements. These results are discussed in the context of current understanding of the role of sugar during the development of tomato fruit, with particular focus given to its impact on hormone levels and organ morphology.