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Nitrate regulates floral induction in Arabidopsis, acting independently of light, gibberellin and autonomous pathways

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97292

Marin,  I. C.
System Regulation, Department Stitt, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97062

Bartetzko,  L.
Plant Cultivation and Transformation, Infrastructure Groups and Service Units, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97427

Stitt,  M.
System Regulation, Department Stitt, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97330

Osuna,  D.
Molecular Genomics, Department Stitt, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;
System Regulation, Department Stitt, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

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Marin-2011-Nitrate regulates fl.pdf
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Zitation

Marin, I. C., Loef, I., Bartetzko, L., Searle, I., Coupland, G., Stitt, M., et al. (2011). Nitrate regulates floral induction in Arabidopsis, acting independently of light, gibberellin and autonomous pathways. Planta, 233(3), 539-552. doi:10.1007/s00425-010-1316-5.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-215B-C
Zusammenfassung
The transition from vegetative growth to reproduction is a major developmental event in plants. To maximise reproductive success, its timing is determined by complex interactions between environmental cues like the photoperiod, temperature and nutrient availability and internal genetic programs. While the photoperiod- and temperature- and gibberellic acid-signalling pathways have been subjected to extensive analysis, little is known about how nutrients regulate floral induction. This is partly because nutrient supply also has large effects on vegetative growth, making it difficult to distinguish primary and secondary influences on flowering. A growth system using glutamine supplementation was established to allow nitrate to be varied without a large effect on amino acid and protein levels, or the rate of growth. Under nitrate-limiting conditions, flowering was more rapid in neutral (12/12) or short (8/16) day conditions in C24, Col-0 and Laer. Low nitrate still accelerated flowering in late-flowering mutants impaired in the photoperiod, temperature, gibberellic acid and autonomous flowering pathways, in the fca co-2 ga1-3 triple mutant and in the ft-7 soc1-1 double mutant, showing that nitrate acts downstream of other known floral induction pathways. Several other abiotic stresses did not trigger flowering in fca co-2 ga1-3, suggesting that nitrate is not acting via general stress pathways. Low nitrate did not further accelerate flowering in long days (16/8) or in 35S::CO lines, and did override the late-flowering phenotype of 35S::FLC lines. We conclude that low nitrate induces flowering via a novel signalling pathway that acts downstream of, but interacts with, the known floral induction pathways.