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Systematic Analysis of Stability Patterns in Plant Primary Metabolism

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97170

Girbig,  D.
BioinformaticsCRG, Cooperative Research Groups, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;
BioinformaticsCIG, Infrastructure Groups and Service Units, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97175

Grimbs,  S.
BioinformaticsCRG, Cooperative Research Groups, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97409

Selbig,  J.
BioinformaticsCRG, Cooperative Research Groups, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Girbig, D., Grimbs, S., & Selbig, J. (2012). Systematic Analysis of Stability Patterns in Plant Primary Metabolism. PLoS One, 7(4), e34686. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0034686.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-1FBE-A
Abstract
Metabolic networks are characterized by complex interactions and regulatory mechanisms between many individual components. These interactions determine whether a steady state is stable to perturbations. Structural kinetic modeling (SKM) is a framework to analyze the stability of metabolic steady states that allows the study of the system Jacobian without requiring detailed knowledge about individual rate equations. Stability criteria can be derived by generating a large number of structural kinetic models (SK-models) with randomly sampled parameter sets and evaluating the resulting Jacobian matrices. Until now, SKM experiments applied univariate tests to detect the network components with the largest influence on stability. In this work, we present an extended SKM approach relying on supervised machine learning to detect patterns of enzyme-metabolite interactions that act together in an orchestrated manner to ensure stability. We demonstrate its application on a detailed SK-model of the Calvin-Benson cycle and connected pathways. The identified stability patterns are highly complex reflecting that changes in dynamic properties depend on concerted interactions between several network components. In total, we find more patterns that reliably ensure stability than patterns ensuring instability. This shows that the design of this system is strongly targeted towards maintaining stability. We also investigate the effect of allosteric regulators revealing that the tendency to stability is significantly increased by including experimentally determined regulatory mechanisms that have not yet been integrated into existing kinetic models.