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Phylogenetic aspects of the sulfate assimilation genes from Thalassiosira pseudonana

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97087

Bromke,  M. A.
Amino Acid and Sulfur Metabolism, Department Willmitzer, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97197

Hoefgen,  R.
Amino Acid and Sulfur Metabolism, Department Willmitzer, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons97193

Hesse,  H.
Amino Acid and Sulfur Metabolism, Department Willmitzer, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

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Bromke-2013-Phylogenetic aspects.pdf
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Zitation

Bromke, M. A., Hoefgen, R., & Hesse, H. (2013). Phylogenetic aspects of the sulfate assimilation genes from Thalassiosira pseudonana. Amino Acids, 44(5), 1253-1265. doi:10.1007/s00726-013-1462-8.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-1E25-A
Zusammenfassung
Diatoms are unicellular algae responsible for approximately 20 % of global carbon fixation. Their evolution by secondary endocytobiosis resulted in a complex cellular structure and metabolism compared to algae with primary plastids. In the last years the interest on unicellular algae increased. On the one hand assessments suggest that diatom-mediated export production can influence climate change through uptake and sequestration of atmospheric CO(2). On the other hand diatoms are in focus because they are discussed as potential producer of biofuels. To follow the one or other idea it is necessary to investigate the diatoms biochemistry in order to understand the cellular regulatory mechanisms. The sulfur assimilation and methionine synthesis pathways provide S-containing amino acids for the synthesis of proteins and a range of metabolites such as dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) in order to provide basic metabolic precursors needed for the diatoms metabolism. To obtain an insight into the localization and organization of the sulfur metabolism pathways, the genome of Thalassiosira pseudonana-a model organism for diatom research-might help to understand the fundamental questions on adaptive responses of diatoms to dynamic environmental conditions such as nutrient availability in a broader context.