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N-terminal residues regulate the catalytic efficiency of the Hsp90 ATPase cycle

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons98723

Reinstein,  Jochen
Abt. III: Physikalische Biochemie, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Richter, K., Reinstein, J., & Buchner, J. (2002). N-terminal residues regulate the catalytic efficiency of the Hsp90 ATPase cycle. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 277(47): 1, pp. 44905-44910. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M208457200.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-0DC4-B
Zusammenfassung
Hsp90 is an abundant molecular chaperone involved in a variety of cellular processes ranging from signal transduction to viral replication. The function of Hsp90 has been shown to be dependent on its ability to hydrolyze ATP, and in vitro studies suggest that the dimeric nature of Hsp90 is critical for this activity. ATP binding occurs at the N-terminal domains of the Hsp90 dimer, whereas the main dimerization site resides in the very C-terminal domain. ATP hydrolysis is performed in a series of conformational changes. These include the association of the two N-terminal domains, which has been shown to stimulate the hydrolysis reaction. In this study, we set out to identify regions in the N-terminal domain that are important for this interaction. We show that N-terminal deletion variants of Hsp90 are severely impaired in their ability to hydrolyze ATP. However, nucleotide binding of these constructs is similar to that of the wild type protein. Heterodimers of the Hsp90 deletion mutants with wild type protein showed that the first 24 amino acids play a crucial role during the ATPase reaction, because their deletion abolishes the trans-activation between the two N-terminal domains. We propose that the turnover rate of Hsp90 is decisively controlled by intermolecular interactions between the N-terminal domains.