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The N terminus of ClpB from <i>Thermus thermophilus</i> is not essential for the chaperone activity

MPS-Authors

Beinker,  Philipp
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Max Planck Society;

Schlee,  Sandra
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Max Planck Society;

Groemping,  Yvonne
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons98729

Seidel,  Ralf
Abt. III: Physikalische Biochemie, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons98723

Reinstein,  Jochen
Abt. III: Physikalische Biochemie, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Beinker, P., Schlee, S., Groemping, Y., Seidel, R., & Reinstein, J. (2002). The N terminus of ClpB from <i>Thermus thermophilus</i> is not essential for the chaperone activity. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 277(49): 1, pp. 47160-47166. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M207853200.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-0DA4-4
Abstract
ClpB from Thermus thermophilus belongs to the Clp/Hsp100 protein family and reactivates protein aggregates in cooperation with the DnaK chaperone system. The mechanism of protein reactivation and interaction with the DnaK system remains unclear. ClpB possesses two nucleotide binding domains, which are essential for function and show a complex allosteric behavior. The role of the N-terminal domain that precedes the first nucleotide binding domain is largely unknown. We purified and characterized an N-terminal shortened ClpB variant (ClpBDeltaN; amino acids 140-854), which remained active in refolding assays with three different substrate proteins. In addition the N-terminal truncation did not significantly change the nucleotide binding affinities, the nucleotide-dependent oligomerization, and the allosteric behavior of the protein. In contrast casein binding and stimulation of the ATPase activity by kappa-casein were affected. These results suggest that the N-terminal domain is not essential for the chaperone function, does not influence the binding of nucleotides, and is not involved in the formation of intermolecular contacts. It contributes to the casein binding site of ClpB, but other substrate proteins do not necessarily interact with the N terminus. This indicates a substantial difference in the binding mode of kappa-casein that is often used as model substrate for ClpB and other possibly more suitable substrate proteins.