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Journal Article

A Novel Armed Oncolytic Measles Vaccine Virus for the Treatment of Cholangiocarcinoma

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons77792

Bossow,  Sascha
Former Research Groups, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons78448

Neubert,  Wolfgang
Former Research Groups, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Lange, S., Lampe, J., Bossow, S., Zimmermann, M., Neubert, W., Bitzer, M., et al. (2013). A Novel Armed Oncolytic Measles Vaccine Virus for the Treatment of Cholangiocarcinoma. HUMAN GENE THERAPY, 24(5), 554-564. doi:10.1089/hum.2012.136.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-F66B-4
Abstract
Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is curable only in early stages by complete surgical resection. Thus, in advanced disease stages in which a complete removal of the tumor mass is no longer possible and palliative chemotherapy achieves only modest success, therapeutics employing new methods of action are desperately needed. Oncolytic viruses employed in clinical studies have been shown to spread preferentially in cancer cells. Beyond that, virotherapeutic cell killing can be enhanced by virus-based expression of suicide genes. We engineered a measles vaccine virus (MeV) vector expressing super cytosine deaminase (SCD), a fusion protein of yeast cytosine deaminase and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, which converts the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and subsequently to 5-fluorouridine-monophosphate. This novel vector was evaluated using three different human-derived CC cell lines. In vitro, all CC cell lines were found to be permissive to MeV infection. Partial blocking of MeV-mediated oncolysis could be overcome by employment of the SCD transgene together with administration of 5-FC. In vivo, intratumoral application of SCD-armed MeV together with a systemic 5-FC treatment showed a significant reduction in tumor size in a TFK-1 xenograft mouse model when compared with virus-only treatment. In a second animal experiment employing a HuCCT1 xenograft tumor model, an enhanced SCD-armed MeV vector, in which the SCD transgene was expressed from a different genomic position, led not only to reduced tumor volumes, but also to a significant survival benefit. On the basis of these encouraging preclinical data on employment of SCD-armed MeV for the virotherapeutic treatment of chemotherapy-resistant CC, a clinical virotherapy trial is set up currently.