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Journal Article

Visually induced height orientation of the fly Musca domestica

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84306

Wehrhahn,  C
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84160

Reichardt,  W
Former Department Information Processing in Insects, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Wehrhahn, C., & Reichardt, W. (1975). Visually induced height orientation of the fly Musca domestica. Biological Cybernetics, 20(1), 37-50. doi:10.1007/BF00350998.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-F198-8
Abstract
The visually controlled height orientation of fixed flying flies (Musca domestica) was investigated. The flight lift force measured by a transducer drives the vertical motion of a panorama. The dynamical conditions of the free flight are electronically simulated for the fly with respect to this degree of freedom of motion. In most of the experimentally investigated cases the panorama consists of a horizontally oriented narrow dark stripe on a bright background. The fly orientates with respect to the stripe, transporting it into a stable fixation position just below the equatorial plane of its compound eyes. It is experimentally demonstrated that the formalism of the linearized theory of the pattern induced flight orientation — Poggio and Reichardt (1973a) — can be applied to describe the height orientation of the fly. The experimental evidence concerning the simultaneous perception of stripes moving in a well defined manner in front of each of the two compound eyes is consistent with the hypothesis that the two halves of the visual system are perceptually additive.