de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
English
 
Help Guide Disclaimer Contact us Login
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Parallel pathways in the visual system: Their role in perception at isoluminance

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84063

Logothetis,  NK
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Schiller, P., Logothetis, N., & Charles, E. (1991). Parallel pathways in the visual system: Their role in perception at isoluminance. Neuropsychologia, 29(6), 433-441. doi:10.1016/0028-3932(91)90003-Q.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-EE39-A
Abstract
It has been proposed that the functions of the two major parallel channels of the primate visual system, the color-opponent and the broad-band, can be determined in psychophysical experiments by eliminating luminance but maintaining chrominance information (isoluminance), since under such conditions the broad-band channel is believed to be silenced. To test this proposition we examined the visual functions of monkeys after blocking either of these channels and we also assessed the responses of neurons to isoluminant stimuli in the lateral geniculate nucleus. We show that color, texture, stereopsis and pattern perception in the absence of the color-opponent channel, and flicker and motion perception in the absence of the broad-band channel are compromised. Yet isoluminance functions for stereopsis and texture in the absence of the broad-band channel and for motion in the absence of the color-opponent channel are indistinguishable from normal. Our recordings show that the neuronal responses of the broad-band cells for isoluminant exchange of red and green lights are reduced but not eliminated and that the color-opponent cells also become similarly less responsive under these conditions. We conclude that perceptual losses at isoluminance are not specific for either channel.