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Poster

What object attributes determine canonical views?

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83815

Blanz,  V
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84280

Vetter,  T
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84981

Tarr,  MJ
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Blanz, V., Vetter, T., Bülthoff, H., & Tarr, M. (1995). What object attributes determine canonical views?. Poster presented at 18th European Conference on Visual Perception, Tübingen, Germany.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-EC6E-4
Zusammenfassung
We investigated preferred or canonical views for familiar and three-dimensional nonsense objects using computer-graphics psychophysics. We assessed the canonical views for objects by allowing participants to actively rotate realistically shaded three-dimensional models in real-time. Objects were viewed on a Silicon Graphics workstation and manipulated in virtual space with a three-degree-of-freedom input device. In the first experiment, participants adjusted each object to the viewpoint from which they would take a photograph if they planned to use the object to illustrate a brochure. In the second experiment, participants mentally imaged each object on the basis of the name and then adjusted the object to the viewpoint from which they imagined it. In both experiments, there was a large degree of consistency across participants in terms of the preferred view for a given object. Our results provide new insights on the geometrical, experiential, and functional attributes that determine canonical views under ecological conditions.