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Effects of Contrast, Temporal Frequency and Chromatic Content on Orientation Discrimination

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84166

Reisbeck,  TE
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83926

Gegenfurtner,  KR
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Reisbeck, T., & Gegenfurtner, K.(1996). Effects of Contrast, Temporal Frequency and Chromatic Content on Orientation Discrimination (32).


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-EB68-5
Zusammenfassung
We compared the mechanisms responsible for orientation discrimination of stimuli defined by luminance and red/green isoluminant contrast in three tasks. A 4-AFC paradigm was used to determine thresholds for discriminating 1 cpd sinewave gratings differing in orientation, contrast, or both. When measuring orientation thresholds as a function of stimulus contrast, we found a decrease in thresholds with increasing stimulus contrast. For three temporal frequencies (0 Hz, 1 Hz, and 8 Hz) the functions relating orientation thresholds to stimulus contrast had similar shapes for luminance and isoluminant gratings, indicating similar processing mechanisms. Thresholds for stationary and slowly moving gratings were consistently lower for isoluminant than for luminance gratings when contrast was expressed on an absolute RMS-cone-contrast scale. When contrast was defined as multiples of detection thresholds discrimination was slightly better for luminance gratings. Thresholds for fast moving gratings were similar irrespective of the definition of contrast. For both luminance and isoluminant gratings, we found a marked "oblique-effect" when measuring thresholds as a function of standard orientation. Finally, we measured discrimination thresholds for gratings that varied in contrast and orientation simultaneously. The shapes of the resulting two-dimensional threshold contours were similar for luminance and isoluminant gratings, indicating again that these stimuli undergo the same neuronal processing. Performance of the observers could be described by probability summation of the orientation and contrast cues, resulting in an elliptical shape of the two-dimensional threshold contours. In conclusion, our results show similar performance for luminance and isoluminant gratings in three different orientation discrimination tasks. The similarity in shape of the different threshold functions presents strong evidence that a single common mechanism might underlie orientation discrimination of luminance and isoluminant stimuli.