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Journal Article

Visual neurobiology: Colouring the cortex

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83926

Gegenfurtner,  KR
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Gegenfurtner, K. (1997). Visual neurobiology: Colouring the cortex. Nature, 388(6637), 23-24. Retrieved from http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v388/n6637/full/388023a0.html.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-EA0A-0
Abstract
In humans, the neural basis for colour vision lies in the activity of the 'colour-opponent' neurons, which receive inputs of opposite sign from the three different classes of cone photoreceptors that are found in the eye (Fig. 1). Colour-opponent neurons are abundant in the first stages of the visual pathway — the retina and the lateral geniculate nucleus. Surprisingly, however, they are observed rather infrequently by single-cell recordings in the next stage, the primary visual cortex (V1), where neurons that add inputs from all three cone types predominate.