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The Craik-O'Brien-Cornsweet illusion in colour: Quantitative characterisation and comparison with luminance

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84306

Wehrhahn,  C
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Wachtler, T., & Wehrhahn, C. (1997). The Craik-O'Brien-Cornsweet illusion in colour: Quantitative characterisation and comparison with luminance. Perception, 26(11), 1423-1430. doi:10.1068/p261423.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-E9BA-C
Zusammenfassung
The strength of the Craik-O'Brien-Cornsweet illusion was measured for different values of spatial and temporal stimulus parameters, in the traditional achromatic version, and in an isoluminant colour version. It was found that the illusion is much weaker with isoluminant colour stimuli than with achromatic luminance stimuli. The illusion depends on the spatial parameters of the stimulus in a way that yields an approximate scale invariance: The strength of the illusion is similar for different stimulus sizes, as long as the ratio of the width of the transition region around the edge, where luminance or colour change, to the total stimulus width is preserved. In both the achromatic and the chromatic case, the strength of the illusion decreases with increasing presentation time. The similarity of the differences between brightness and colour effects on one hand and the differences in sensitivity for colour and luminance changes in humans on the other suggests that a lack of gradient detection underlies the Craik-O'Brien-Cornsweet illusion.