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The contribution of color to visual memory in X-chromosome-linked dichromats

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83926

Gegenfurtner,  K
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84314

Wichmann,  FA
Department Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Gegenfurtner, K., Wichmann, F., & Sharpe, L. (1998). The contribution of color to visual memory in X-chromosome-linked dichromats. Vision Research, 38(7), 1041-1045. doi:10.1016/S0042-6989(97)00200-9.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-E8A7-B
Abstract
We used a recognition memory paradigm to assess the visual memory of X-chromosome-linked dichromats for color images of natural scenes. The performance of 17 protanopes and 14 deuteranopes, who lack the second (red-green opponent) subsystem of color vision, but retain the primordial (yellow-blue opponent) subsystem, was compared with that of 36 color normal observers. During the presentation phase, 48 images of natural scenes were displayed on a CRT for durations between 50 and 1000 msec. Each image was followed by a random noise mask. Half of the images were presented in color and half in black and white. In the subsequent query phase, the same 48 images were intermixed with 48 new images and the subjects had to indicate which of the images they had already seen during the presentation phase. We find that the performance of the color normal observers increases with exposure duration. However, they perform 5–10 better for colored than for black and white images, even at exposure durations as short as 50 msec. Surprisingly, performance is not impaired for the dichromats, whose recognition performance is also better for colored than for black and white images. We conclude either that X-chromosome-linked dichromats may be able to compensate for their reduced chromatic information range when viewing complex natural scenes or that the chromatic information in most natural scenes, for the durations tested, is sufficiently represented by the surviving primordial color subsystem.