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Effects of contrast and temporal frequency on orientation discrimination for luminance and isoluminant stimuli

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84166

Reisbeck,  TE
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83926

Gegenfurtner,  KR
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Reisbeck, T., & Gegenfurtner, K. (1998). Effects of contrast and temporal frequency on orientation discrimination for luminance and isoluminant stimuli. Vision Research, 38(8), 1105-1117. doi:10.1016/S0042-6989(97)00240-X.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-E8A5-F
Abstract
thresholds to stimulus contrast had similar shapes for luminance and isoluminant gratings, indicating similar processing mechanisms. Thresholds for stationary or slowly moving gratings were consistently lower for isoluminant than for luminance gratings, when contrast was expressed on an absolute RMS-cone-contrast scale. When contrast was defined as multiples of detection thresholds, discrimination was slightly better for luminance gratings. Thresholds for fast moving gratings were similar, irrespective of the definition of contrast. In contrast to previous work, we found a marked “oblique-effect” for both luminance and isoluminant gratings, when measuring discrimination thresholds as a function of standard orientation. Finally, we measured discrimination thresholds for gratings that varied in contrast and orientation simultaneously. The shapes of the resulting two-dimensional threshold contours were similar for luminance and isoluminant gratings, indicating again that these stimuli undergo similar neuronal processing. Performance of the observers could be described by probability summation of the orientation and contrast cues, resulting in an elliptical shape of the two-dimensional threshold contours. In conclusion, our results show similar performance for luminance and isoluminant gratings in several orientation discrimination tasks. The similarity in shape of the different threshold functions presents strong evidence that similar mechanisms underlie orientation discrimination of luminance and isoluminant stimuli.