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Poster

Visual homing to a virtual home

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84273

van Veen,  HAHC
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84170

Riecke,  BE
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

van Veen, H., Riecke, B., & Bülthoff, H. (1999). Visual homing to a virtual home. Poster presented at Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO 1999), Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-E6C1-0
Zusammenfassung
Purpose: Results from previous studies (e.g. Loomis et al., JEP, 1993) suggest that proprioceptive cues play a major role in human homing behaviour. We conducted triangle completion experiments in virtual environments to measure homing performance based solely on visual cues. Methods: Subjects were seated in the centre of a large half-cylindrical 180° projection screen and steered smoothly through the simulated scene using mouse buttons. Experiments were conducted in two environments: an extended volume filled with random blobs (inducing strong vection), and a photorealistic town containing distinct landmarks. On each trial, subjects had to return to their starting point after moving outwards along two prescribed segments (40m long, subtending a 30°..150° horizontal angle) of an imaginary triangle. To exclude scene-matching as a homing strategy, the simulated environment was modified to a different but similar one just before the subject started the return movement. Results: We found strong systematic errors in distance travelled but only small deviations in turning angles. After some practice the variability (standard deviation) of the responses typically dropped to roughly 10m for distance and 10 degree for turns (lower variability for town than for blobs-scene). Omitting the scene modification before the return movement resulted in nearly perfect performance, stressing the dominant role of piloting under natural conditions. Exchanging the mouse interface for a more realistic bicycle interface, thus introducing proprioceptive cues for side-ways tilt and pedal resistance, reduced the systematic error in rotation but also increased the overall variability. Conclusion: Path integration using optical information alone is sufficient for accurate homing.