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Velocity constancy in a virtual reality environment

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83888

Distler,  H
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83926

Gegenfurtner,  KR
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84273

van Veen,  HAHC
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Distler, H., Gegenfurtner, K., van Veen, H., & Hawken, M. (2000). Velocity constancy in a virtual reality environment. Perception, 29(12), 1423-1435. doi:10.1068/p3115.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-E3E6-7
Zusammenfassung
During everyday life the brain is continuously integrating multiple perceptual cues in order to allow us to make decisions and to guide our actions. In this study we have used a simulated (virtual reality -- VR) visual environment to investigate how cues to speed judgments are integrated. There are two sources that could be used to provide signals for velocity-constancy, temporal-frequency, or distance cues. However, evidence from most psychophysical studies favour temporal-frequency cues. Here we report that two depth cues that provide a relative object - object distance, disparity, and motion parallax, can provide a significant input to velocity-constancy judgments, particularly when combined. This result indicates that the second mechanism can also play a significant role in generating velocity constancy. Furthermore, we show that cognitive factors such as familiar size can influence the perception of object speed. The results suggest that both low-level cues to spatiotemporal structure and depth, and high-level cues, such as object familiarity, are integrated by the brain during velocity estimation in real-world viewing.