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The Role of Dynamic Object Properties in Categorisation

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84298

Wallraven,  C
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84426

Newell,  FN
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83985

Huber,  SA
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Wallraven, C., Newell, F., & Huber, S. (2001). The Role of Dynamic Object Properties in Categorisation. Poster presented at 12th Conference of the European Society for Cognitive Psychology (ESCoP 2001), Edinburgh, UK.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-E214-B
Abstract
We investigated whether dynamic properties of an object can be used to the same extent as spatial properties in a categorisation task. 16 participants were instructed to categorise computer-generated objects varying systematically in four dimensions: two spatial dimensions (3D-shape and colour) and two dynamic dimensions (route taken and object's action). The task consisted of a learning phase and a test phase. In the learning phase, participants were presented with two prototype objects and learned, via feedback, to correctly categorise these prototypes. In the test phase participants had to categorise a new sample of objects into the previously learned categories. These new objects differed from the prototype objects in either 1, 2, 3, or all of the stimulus dimensions. We found that participants showed no bias towards either the spatial or dynamic cues when both cues were useful for categorisation. For the dynamic information, however, we found a significant bias towards action. Our findings suggest that both spatial and dynamic information is equally relevant for categorisation purposes, although for dynamic information more attention is paid to how an object moves rather than where the object is going.