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Journal Article

Effects of visual illusions on grasping

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84990

Franz,  V
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Fahle M, Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83926

Gegenfurtner,  K
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Franz, V., Fahle M, Bülthoff, H., & Gegenfurtner, K. (2001). Effects of visual illusions on grasping. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 27(5), 1124-1144. doi:10.1037/0096-1523.27.5.1124.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-E1EE-B
Abstract
In 2 experiments, the Muller-Lyer illusion (F. C. Muller-Lyer, 1889; N = 16) and the parallel-lines illusion (W. Wundt, 1898; N = 26) clearly affected maximum preshape aperture in grasping (both ps < .001). The grasping effects were similar but not perfectly equal to the perceptual effects. Control experiments show that these differences can be attributed to problems in matching the perceptual task and the grasping task. A model is described stating the assumptions that are needed to compare the grasping effects and the perceptual effects of visual illusions. Further studies on the relationship between perception and grasping are reviewed. These studies provide no clear evidence for a dissociation between perception and grasping and therefore do not support the action versus perception hypothesis (A. D. Milner M. A. Goodale, 1995).