de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
Deutsch
 
Hilfe Wegweiser Impressum Kontakt Einloggen
  DetailsucheBrowse

Datensatz

DATENSATZ AKTIONENEXPORT

Freigegeben

Bericht

Grasp effects of the Ebbinghaus illusion: Obstacle-avoidance is not the explanation

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84990

Franz,  V
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Externe Ressourcen
Es sind keine Externen Ressourcen verfügbar
Volltexte (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Volltexte verfügbar
Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Ergänzenden Materialien verfügbar
Zitation

Franz, V., Bülthoff, H., & Fahle, M.(2002). Grasp effects of the Ebbinghaus illusion: Obstacle-avoidance is not the explanation (91).


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-DFAA-3
Zusammenfassung
It is often assumed that the primate brain processes visual information in two different streams, one for visual awareness (or perception) and one for motor performance. Previous reports that the Ebbinghaus illusion deceives perception but not grasping, seemed to provide strong evidence for this perception versus action hypothesis. The dichotomy between an action stream and a perceptual stream appeared to be fundamental enough to be reflected in the overt behavior of non neurological, healthy humans. Contrary to this view, we show that the Ebbinghaus illusion affects grasping to the same extent as perception. We also show that the grasp effects cannot be accounted for by non perceptual obstacle avoidance mechanisms, as was recently suggested (Haffenden amp;amp; Goodale, 2000; Haffenden, Schiff, amp;amp; Goodale, 2001). Instead, even subtle variations of the Ebbinghaus illusion affect grasping in the same way as perception. Our results suggest that the same signals are responsible for the perceptual effects and for the motor effects of the Ebbinghaus illusion. This casts doubt on one line of evidence which has often been counted as being especially strong in favor of the perception versus action hypothesis.