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Journal Article

Ultra High-Resolution fMRI in Monkeys with Implanted RF Coils

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84063

Logothetis,  NK
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84805

Merkle,  H
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83787

Augath,  MA
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84262

Trinath,  T
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Logothetis, N., Merkle, H., Augath, M., Trinath, T., & Ugurbil, K. (2002). Ultra High-Resolution fMRI in Monkeys with Implanted RF Coils. Neuron, 35(2), 227-242. doi:10.1016/S0896-6273(02)00775-4.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-DF86-4
Abstract
Spatiotemporally resolved functional MRI (fMRI) in animals can reveal how wide-spread neural networks are organized and accompanying electrophysiological recordings can show how small neural assemblies contribute to this organization. Here we present a novel technique that yields high-resolution structural and functional images of the monkey brain with small, tissue-compatible, intraosteally implantable radiofrequency coils. Voxel sizes as small as 0.0113 μl with high signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios were obtained, revealing both structural and functional cortical architecture in great detail. Up to a certain point, contrast sensitivity increased with decreasing voxel size, probably because of the decreased partial volume effects. Spatial specificity was demonstrated by the lamina-specific activation in experiments comparing responses to moving and flickering stimuli. The implications of this technique for combined fMRI/electrophysiology experiments and its limitations in terms of spatial coverage are discussed.